Tag Archives: sleep

Things I got done this year

After a challenging 2016-17 school year in which I was pressed into duty as Interim Dean of Students, this year I was able to get back to my regular gig as a mid-level administrator. From this perch I am able to work on projects that are important but not urgent; the sweet spot in the Eisenhower Decision Matrix. Here are some projects I completed this year of which I am particularly proud.

Mobile Device Policy The school’s antiquated Cell Phone Policy has been in place since right after 9/11 when the school realized that it needed to permit students to carry a phone so that they could contact their parents in the event of an emergency. But the old policy was hindering academic innovation by decreeing that phones must be off in classroom buildings. Teaming with our Academic Technology Integrationist, Howard Glasser, we wrote a new policy that addresses mobile devices, not just phones, and permits classroom teachers the flexibility they need to employ mobile technology in their pedagogy if they so choose. The new policy also allows students the latitude to use their devices to stay organized and consult the LMS (Canvas). Since this is a boarding school, we also provided new guidelines for our evening study hall and late-night dorm use. You can read more about the new policy in my last blog post, here.

Endangerment Rewrite Going back to last year, I had been working on a revision to one of our major school rules, “Endangering the Safety of Others.” The language in our handbook was frustrating me because this is a large and important category of behaviors that the deans worry about, but the current policy seems only concerned about the dangers of incendiary devices. I also have grown concerned about dangerous driving, helmetless skateboarding, and students providing each other with tattoos and piercings in unsafe ways. The new policy language I wrote addresses these concerns, and it also has changed the name of the rule to the simple “Endangerment,” thus placing equal weight on behaviors than endanger oneself, not just others.

I should note that it took me two attempts to get this policy revision approved by the full faculty. I trust our Quaker process, and my first attempt didn’t provide enough time for discussion. I am very thankful that my colleagues ultimately gave the revision their blessing.

REACH things My role as the REACH admin here in the deans’ office took up a lot of my time and attention this year. While we nominally rolled out REACH at the end of the 2016-17 school year, this was the first full year that we used this digital sign-in/sign-out software. I’ve written about it on blog elsewhere, but I will note that there is an exciting software update coming in August, and it may lead to everyone here liking REACH even more. It has taken time to figure out all the best ways to configure the software to meet our needs most fully, but by the end of the year we were using it to replace our old system of collecting vacation travel information, so we are really converts. If the mobile apps become faster and more pleasurable for the user, then the students and dorm parents will have fewer complaints, and I’ll be able to take advantage of even more of the capabilities in REACH. You can read more about REACH in my blog posts here and here.

Attendance System 3.0 This project was a major undertaking for our IT department, and I can’t claim much credit. I have served as a spokesman for the deans’ office and what we want to see in the functionality of the new system, and I am the dean who most directly supports our attendance supervisor, who is the most important end user. Our new attendance system, which is completely homemade, is now offering a host of new options for students. They can clear cuts and lates electronically without needing to take a piece of paper to a teacher, and their advisor can look over their shoulder and help guide them. The faculty can now pull dynamic info about who is out of school on a given day instead of receiving a static report once per day. (But they can click a little button and subscribe to the report, and then they get an email like the one they used to get. I love the way the new system feels comfortable for users who don’t like change, but offers better visibility to power users.) This big project isn’t done yet, and when the new features for parents are rolled out the whole thing will be far more automated than before. Just as REACH (ideally) takes busywork away from the deans so that they can do more high level, critical thinking tasks to keep kids safe, the new attendance system will ultimately take busywork away from our attendance supervisor.

Network Restricted Lists Gaming addiction is a major story in the NYTimes this week, and we are dealing with it in boarding school land, too. Our old school policies, which forbid students to have televisions in their dorm rooms, haven’t been updated to respond to streaming gaming, “Netflix and chill,” etc. I approached our committee of dorm heads to ask them to collaborate with me on new policy language to address the concern, but they basically came back at me and said, “Why don’t we just shut off the wifi for kids with a problem?” So that’s the approach we have taken. We’ve created two new network access levels (whether a student is on the school’s wifi or wired network) that grant more restricted hours of use. The second, stricter list also denies access to popular gaming, entertainment, and social media sites and services. The hope is that we will not need to use these new tools very often in the coming years, but if we have kids under our care who cannot moderate their own device use such that they are not getting satisfactory sleep, we can temporarily assign them to one of these lists to support them.

Again and again, the story of these projects is one in which open-minded collaboration with colleagues leads to better outcomes than if I just apply executive force. I don’t always get exactly what I want, but (if I try sometimes) the school gets what it needs. Happy summer vacation, school people!

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Digital Distractions vs. Substances

For the last few weeks the article “Are teenagers replacing drugs with smartphones” from the NYTimes has been lingering in my mind. Written by Matt Richtel and published on 3.13.17, the article explores the theory that substance abuse has declined among teenage students over the last decade because the time they would have used to experiment with drugs has been squeezed out by all the time they are spending on their mobile devices. While the article admits that there have been no conclusive studies done yet to support the theory, it certainly seems plausible — even likely — to me and my colleagues. I brought the article to a recent deans staff meeting for discussion, and our subjective, anecdotal evidence makes us feel like the theory must be true.

The news that substance abuse is down, in some categories roughly 10%, among teens, should of course be greeted with joy. But the idea that substances are being crowded out by a new addiction, mobile devices, makes one wonder if the cure isn’t worse than the disease. I bring a pro-tech bias to my work as an educator, but I also worry that addiction to mobile devices may end up being a more widespread and insidious social ill than nicotine, alcohol, and other substances were in the 20th century. Will deaths caused by distracted driving eventually exceed those caused by drunk driving? (Not if cars are all self-driving in the near future.) Will addiction to social media and mobile gaming lead to a generation of zombies more sleepless and in need of their fix than addicts during the crack epidemic? (Not if parents and boarding school faculty like me equip children with tools and habits to help them unplug at night and during community time.)

I’m focused on asking myself what a dean of students at a boarding school should do if we grant that the thesis is correct. The problem with addressing this mobile-device addiction is that our use of these devices switches back and forth hundreds of times each day among different modes of use. One minute we are using our devices for important work, the next minute we are checking our feeds, the next minute we are responding to a text from a family member, and the next minute we are pulled back into that new game we really love. Teachers can’t possibly know how a student is using their device at any moment, and the temptation to overreact is strong.

Where is all this heading? Speaking only for myself, I think we need greater clarity in our school-wide policies as to what sort of mobile device use is acceptable in which contexts. We must carve out community spaces and times in which no use is permitted at all. Boarding schools need to think about sleep issues as well. (I’m influenced here by Jonathan Crary’s haunting book 24/7.) A small number of teenage boarding students are able to unplug from their devices at night without prompting or assistance from adults, but most cannot. True to the Swiss army knife aspect of smartphones, most teens now use their device as their alarm clock, which means that if you confiscate their phone to help them get undistracted sleep, you’ve increased the likelihood that they’ll be late to class! Wristwatches and old-fashioned alarm clocks are not very popular among today’s teens.

The most worrying factoid from Richtel’s article is that the drop in substance use seen in young people ages 12-18 is not showing up among college students. Those college students are using substances as much as ever. How do we understand this data? Will substance use among college-aged people drop as the current 12-18 year-olds age, or are we seeing something much more troubling? If use has dropped so significantly among middle school and high school kids, but not among college students, that means that we are seeing more college students than ever who left for college having never experimented with or abused substances but who begin to do so after leaving home. This strikes me as a terrifying prospect. Colleges simply do not provide the careful attention to student well-being and safety net that secondary schools do. Therefore, high school teachers must continue to educate their students about the perils of substances even if the data suggests that fewer and fewer of our kids are actually at risk while under our care. We educate not just for the present, but mostly for the future.